Category Archives: psychotherapy

What is Psychoanalysis? Part 4: The Ego, the Id and the Superego – Freud Museum

Ego Id Superego

IN THIS EPISODE:
A fractured self
The ego, the id and the superego
Why did Freud develop a new model?
Devils and angels
People fall ill of their moral ideals
A horse and a rider
The ego is like a politician
The goal of analysis is to stop the ego being so silly

More info: www.freud.org.uk/education/

What is Psychoanalysis? Part 3: Oedipus Complex – Freud Museum London

psychoanalysis - oedipus

Click here to see the third part of the Freud Museum introductory video series on psychoanalysis.

IN THIS EPISODE:
The emotional world of children
His Majesty the Baby
The mother as first love object
Is it sexual?
Jealousy, rivalry, hatred and anxiety
The role of the father
Gender: Freud didn’t think you were just ‘born a boy’ or ‘born a girl’
There is no perfect resolution of the Oedipus complex
It marks us for life

More info: www.freud.org.uk/education/

What is Psychoanalysis? Part 2: Sexuality – Freud Museum London

psychoanalysis - sexuality

Click here to see the second part of the Freud Museum introductory video series on psychoanalysis. 

IN THIS EPISODE:
An enlarged concept of sexuality
Infantile sexuality
Perversion is something we’re born with
Normal and abnormal
Psychosexual stages of development: oral, anal, phallic
Repression
Sexuality and symptoms

More info: www.freud.org.uk/education/

Oliver Sacks on his analysis: ‘The longest running psychoanalysis on record’

Oliver Sacks

Please click here to visit ‘Web of Stories’ site and listen to Oliver Sacks the neurologist and author of Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat talking about his 46-year-long analysis. “I think that we are beginning to get somewhere now…”

Anouchka Grose: The Unconscious from Freud to Lacan

Anouchka Grose

[Click here to visit the Freud Museum Site and hear the Podcast]

While the contents of the unconscious might be obscure and perplexing, when Freud spoke about ‘the unconscious’ he meant something very precise. This talk will look at Freud’s ‘discovery’ of the unconscious, and at his conceptualisation of it. It will also deal with the peculiar logic of symptom formation. From there, it will go on to look at Lacan’s notion of the language-like unconscious, showing how this was developed in accordance with Freud’s ideas.

Anouchka Grose is a psychoanalyst and writer practising in London. She is a member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research, where she regularly lectures. She is the author of No More Silly Love Songs: a realist’s guide to romance (Portobello, 2010) and Are you Considering Therapy (Karnac, 2011), and is the editor of ‘Hysteria Today’, a collection of essays to be published by Karnac later this year. She also writes for The Guardian and teaches at Camberwell School of Art.

Why Remember? LSE Podcast with Lisa Appignanesi, Darian Leader & Owen Sheers

Why remember

[Click here to go the the LSE site and listen to the podcast.]

Speaker(s): Lisa Appignanesi, Darian Leader, Owen Sheers
Chair: Professor Sandra Jovchelovitch

Recorded on 28 February 2015.

This panel explores our relationship with our sometimes traumatic past, and asks why we should remember and what happens when we can’t remember. The discussion considers the importance of place and landscape in memory, as well as the nature of collective memory and memorialisation, particularly in the context of war.

Lisa Appignanesi (@LisaAppignanesi) is a writer, novelist and broadcaster. She is the former Chair of the Freud Museum London, the former President of English PEN and former Deputy Director of London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts. Her non-fiction includes Mad, Bad and Sad: A History of Women and the Mind Doctors (which won the BMA Award for the Public Understanding of Science amongst other prizes), the acclaimed family memoir Losing the Dead, the classic study Freud’s Women (with John Forrester) and Simone de Beauvoir, and most recently Trials of Passion: Crimes in the Name of Love and Madness. Her novels include Paris Requiem, The Memory Man and The Dead of Winter. Lisa Appignanesi was awarded the OBE in 2013.

Darian Leader is a psychoanalyst working in London and a founder member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research. He is President of the College of Psychoanalysts-UK and Visiting Professor at the School of Human and Life Sciences, Roehampton University. He is the author of several books including: Introducing Lacan, Why do women write more letters than they post?; Freud’s Footnotes; Stealing the Mona Lisa: What Art Stops Us From Seeing, Why do people get ill?’ (with David Corfield), The New Black: Mourning, Melancholia and Depression and What is Madness? His most recent book, Strictly Bipolar was published by Hamish Hamilton in 2013.

Owen Sheers (@owensheers) has written two collections of poetry, The Blue Book and Skirrid Hill, which won a Somerset Maugham award. His verse drama Pink Mist won Wales Book of the Year and the Hay Festival Poetry Medal. His non-fiction includes The Dust Diaries and Calon: A Journey to the Heart of Welsh Rugby. His first novel Resistance has been translated into ten languages and was made into a film in 2011. His plays include The Passion, The Two Worlds of Charlie F. and Mametz. Owen wrote and presented BBC Four’s A Poet’s Guide to Britain. He has been a NYPL Cullman Fellow, Writer in Residence for the Wordsworth Trust and Artist in Residence for the Welsh Rugby Union. His second novel I Saw A Man will be published by Faber in 2015

 

Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips: Poetry as Therapy

Adam Phillips PoetryAdam Phillips: “On the one hand, psychoanalysis is practical in the sense that there is an attempt to solve a problem, or to cure somebody, or at least to address their suffering. But the other thing that psychoanalysis does is that the project is to enable somebody to speak. It’s the attempt to create the conditions in which somebody can speak themselves as fully as possible.”

[Click here to read the whole article on The Economist site]

‘Like An Open Sky’ – a documentary about the ‘Courtil’ treatment centre for children

It’s very good to hear that Mariana Otero’s acclaimed film about Le Courtil, the Lacanian-oriented treatment centre on the French-Belgium border for children, adolescents and adults with mental health problems, will be released with subtitles in the UK in October. We’ll try to see about getting a showing in Bristol somehow…

like-an-open-sky

“Alysson considers her body with mistrust. Evanne spins and twists until he collapses. Amina can’t manage to make words come out of her mouth. At the border between France and Belgium there exists a special place which takes care of psychologically and socially challenged children. Day after day, the adults working there try to understand the enigma that each of these children represent and invent, case by case, without ever imposing anything, solutions that will help them live peaceful lives.”

Click the image below to watch the trailer for the film on YouTube: open sky