Tag Archives: Bristol

Lacan’s Concept of Clinical Structures – CFAR/Bristol University 2017/2018

CFAR IN ASSOCIATION WITH BRISTOL UNIVERSITY 2017/2018

Lacan’s Concept of Clinical Structures

Four public seminars on the topics of Neurosis (hysteria and obsession), Psychosis and Perversion will take place throughout the year.  No prior knowledge of Lacan is assumed and the seminars will all include clinical examples involving the kind of problems and questions common to diverse currents in contemporary psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

THE STRUCTURES WE CALL CLINICAL – VINCENT DACHY – Psychoanalyst in London and member of CFAR; NLS and WAP

 Date:  Saturday, October 7, 2017

Attendance Fee: £15 students £10

Venue: Merchant Venturers Building, Room 1.11

Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB

Time: 10am – 12 midday

Registration: 9.15am on the day

 Please address enquiries to

Elizabeth O’Loughlin at elizaariadne@blueyonder.co.uk

Jill Brown at mjillbrown@hotmail.com  

Kurt Lampe at clkwl@bristol.ac.uk

3rd CFAR/Bristol University Lecture: ‘Repetition’ with Darian Leader

CFAR IN ASSOCIATION WITH BRISTOL UNIVERSITY 2016/2017

 Lacan’s Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis.

 Four public seminars on the topics of transference, the unconscious, repetition and the drive will take place throughout the year. No prior knowledge of Lacan is assumed and the seminars will all include clinical examples involving the kind of problems and questions common to diverse currents in contemporary psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

REPETITION with DARIAN LEADER Psychoanalyst and Author

Date:  June 10, 2017

Attendance Fee: £15 students £10

Venue: Merchant Venturers Building, Room 1.11

Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB

Time: 10am – 12 midday

Registration: 9.15am on the day

 Please address enquiries to

Elizabeth O’Loughlin at elizaariadne@blueyonder.co.uk

Jill Brown at mjillbrown@hotmail.com 

Kurt Lampe at clkwl@bristol.ac.uk

 Future date: July 1, 2017. The Drive

2nd CFAR & Bristol University Public Lecture: The Unconscious – Astrid Gessert – March 4th 2017

 

 

 

 

 

CFAR IN ASSOCIATION WITH BRISTOL UNIVERSITY 2016/2017

Lacan’s Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis.

Four public seminars on the topics of transference, the unconscious, repetition and the drive will take place throughout the year. No prior knowledge of Lacan is assumed and the seminars will all include clinical examples involving the kind of problems and questions common to diverse currents in contemporary psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

THE UNCONSCIOUS

Astrid Gessert is a Psychoanalyst, a member of CFAR and the College of Psychoanalysts. She is a regular contributor to the CFAR Public Lecture and Training Programme

Date: March 4, 2017

Attendance Fee: £15 students £10

Venue: Merchant Venturers Building, Room 1.11

Woodland Road, BristolBS8 1UB

Time: 10am – 11.45am

Registration: 9.30am on the day

Please address enquiries to

Elizabeth O’Loughlin at elizaariadne@blueyonder.co.uk

Jill Brown at mjillbrown@hotmail.com

Kurt Lampe at clkwl@bristol.ac.uk

Future dates: June 10, 2017: Repetition & July 1, 2017: The Drive

First CFAR & Bristol University Public Lectures of 2016: Transference

CFAR-Bristol

CFAR In Association With Bristol University 2016/17

Lacan’s Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis.

Public lecture 1: TRANSFERENCE
with Dr Anne Worthington,
Psychoanalyst and Senior Lecturer,
Centre for Psychoanalysis, Middlesex University

Four public seminars on the topics of transference, the unconscious, repetition and the drive will take place throughout the year. No prior knowledge of Lacan is assumed and the seminars will all include clinical examples involving the kind of problems and questions common to diverse currents in contemporary psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

Date: October 29, 2016
Attendance Fee: £20 students £15
Venue: Merchant Venturers Building
Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB
Time: 11am – 12.30pm
Registration: 10.00am on the day

Please address enquiries to
Lesel Dawson at Lesel.Dawson@bristol.ac.uk
Jill Brown at mjillbrown@hotmail.com
or Elizabeth O’Loughlin at elizaariadne@blueyonder.co.uk

What is Psychoanalysis? Part 4: The Ego, the Id and the Superego – Freud Museum

Ego Id Superego

IN THIS EPISODE:
A fractured self
The ego, the id and the superego
Why did Freud develop a new model?
Devils and angels
People fall ill of their moral ideals
A horse and a rider
The ego is like a politician
The goal of analysis is to stop the ego being so silly

More info: www.freud.org.uk/education/

What is Psychoanalysis? Part 3: Oedipus Complex – Freud Museum London

psychoanalysis - oedipus

Click here to see the third part of the Freud Museum introductory video series on psychoanalysis.

IN THIS EPISODE:
The emotional world of children
His Majesty the Baby
The mother as first love object
Is it sexual?
Jealousy, rivalry, hatred and anxiety
The role of the father
Gender: Freud didn’t think you were just ‘born a boy’ or ‘born a girl’
There is no perfect resolution of the Oedipus complex
It marks us for life

More info: www.freud.org.uk/education/

‘Like An Open Sky’ – a documentary about the ‘Courtil’ treatment centre for children

It’s very good to hear that Mariana Otero’s acclaimed film about Le Courtil, the Lacanian-oriented treatment centre on the French-Belgium border for children, adolescents and adults with mental health problems, will be released with subtitles in the UK in October. We’ll try to see about getting a showing in Bristol somehow…

like-an-open-sky

“Alysson considers her body with mistrust. Evanne spins and twists until he collapses. Amina can’t manage to make words come out of her mouth. At the border between France and Belgium there exists a special place which takes care of psychologically and socially challenged children. Day after day, the adults working there try to understand the enigma that each of these children represent and invent, case by case, without ever imposing anything, solutions that will help them live peaceful lives.”

Click the image below to watch the trailer for the film on YouTube: open sky

The play that wants to change the way we treat mental illness

lapland schitzophreniaCan theatre offer a cure for psychosis? It’s unlikely – and it would be unwise for any theatre-maker even to try. What theatre can do, though, is convey the experience of psychosis: the hallucinations and delusions – often terrifying, sometimes comical – that define reality for those with schizophrenia and related conditions. [Click here to read the rest of the article on the Guardian site.]

Darian Leader: “Heed the new age of anxiety rather than bemoaning it”

Lacanain Psychoanalyst Darian Leader on Anxiety

 

[Click here to read the whole article on the Guardian Website]

If the postwar age of anxiety was supposed to have ended 30 or 40 years ago, a swath of media articles now suggest a dramatic comeback. A new and widely reported study claims a massive increase in anxiety disorders in the UK, with an estimated 8.2 million sufferers compared to 2.3 million in 2007. The pressures of modern life, we are told, must play a large part here, with job stress aggravating the difficulties of urban populations.

The focus on socio-economic conditions is surely a good thing. In the 1980s, Thatcherism encouraged a redrafting of work-related problems as psychological ones. As each person became a unit of economic competition, it wasn’t the market’s fault if they didn’t get a job but their own. Injustice in the marketplace was glossed over as individual failure.

Hundreds of books and articles have questioned this without gaining media exposure, so why the visibility of the new research? I was puzzled to find not a single sentence in the report linking the supposed increase in anxiety to social causes. In fact, there was no explanation at all, and the headline-grabbing prevalence rate for the UK was estimated from Iceland, Norway and Switzerland.

Here, we find a perfect expression of the new mental hygiene movement. Anxiety is grouped together with dementia, stroke and neuromuscular conditions as a “brain disorder”, and the authors urge an approach that uses “comparable methodologies for both mental and neurological illness”. Disorders are listed in terms of their cost to the economy rather than to individual lives, families and communities. […]

Artist Martin Creed on his own psychoanalysis.

martin creed art psychoanalysis bristol

[Click here to read the whole article on Culture24.org.uk]

Anyone with more than a passing acquaintance with the practice of artist Martin Creed will know all about the fastidious numbering of his works. These begin with Work No.3 in 1986 (a yellow painting) and so far stretch as far as this year’s Work No. 1461 (an installation made with adhesive tape).

What might surprise you is that Creed’s appetite for order and record keeping extends to collecting sound files of every interview he undertakes. So when I catch him on the phone a technical hitch at his end throws the methodical artist.

“Wait, are you recording this?” he wants to know. “Can I get a copy of it?” And after the giving and receiving of assurances that I will later send him an MP3, we are ready to continue. It is quite clear that Creed takes the business of talking seriously.

This bodes well for those lucky enough to find themselves at the Freud Museum during Museums at Night 2013. On Thursday May 16 the Scottish artist will be on the spot, if not on the couch, as he improvises an after hours lecture, with the help of slide projections and a bit of music.

“It’s hard to do things,” he says. “Everything seems just as difficult as everything else: it’s just as much work to try to talk and say something that I think is alright as it is to try to fix and be okay with the shapes or colours in a painting or a sculpture or whatever.”

Creed refuses to be drawn about finer details pertaining to the evening: “I’m not sure — I’ll probably try just to think out loud and talk about whatever comes up”.

But he does admit the event should resonate with his newfound surroundings. “Absolutely, aye,” he says, “I do psychoanalysis and I’m a fan of Freud. Yeah, I have been [in analysis] for a very long time.”

Creed reveals he first saw an analyst in 1993: “I did it because I was desperate. I wanted to speak to someone.” Now he goes four times a week. “It’s a bit like going swimming or something like that: I think it’s an integral part of my life.”

At any rate, intensive therapy is clearly commensurate with a blue chip art career. This most exacting of artists views the activity as labour: “It’s work and I feel like I have to keep doing it.” This may come as some surprise, considering how effortless the artist’s official numbered works appear to be…